Broken Colored Rabbit Patterns

By Ellyn. Filed in Color Genetics, Study Guides  |   
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It’s been an exciting week. I haven’t been so nervous for so long since maybe the ARBA convention 2008 in Louisville.  But it’s a good kind of nervous.  Keep tuned in here; we’ve got some major announcements coming up! But for now…

The Broken Color in Rabbits

*4-H Leaders!* Click here to download this post as a printable handout.

Broken patterned rabbits have spots of color on a white background. All breeds that recognize broken disqualify for complete absence of color around either eye, on either ear, or on the nose.  However, the disqualifications pertaining to amount of color vary from breed to breed.  Every breed but the Satin disqualifies for under 10% color.  The Mini Rex, Polish, Rex, Netherland Dwarf, Havana, and French Angora disqualify for over 50% color.  All other rabbit breeds, such as French Lops, English Lops, Holland Lops, and Mini Lops do not disqualify for over 50% color.

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The broken pattern varies widely from rabbit to rabbit.  The breeds English Spot, Checkered Giant, and Rhinelander are just brokens bred to a specific pattern.  Tri-colored rabbits are also genetic brokens.  Brokens in any breed come in a wide range of patterns.  Some are mostly white with a few colored patches; these are called spotted pattern.  Some have heavier markings that form a semi-solid patch over the back, extending over the hips and up the shoulders; these are called blanket pattern.  Occasionally (most often in Mini Rex) you will see brokens that are mostly colored, with heavy markings on the face.  These are called “booted brokens”, because mostly just the feet and underside are white.  Booted broken rabbits usually cannot be shown because the Mini Rex standard disqualifies brokens with over 50% color.  Although booteds can throw showables, it is better not to use them because the booted pattern will show up in subsequent generations.

You can learn more about  Broken Pattern Rabbit Color Genetics in our publication: “A book About Bunny Colors”.

Match the rabbit to the disqualification in this activity:

 

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